Those Blessings Are Sweetest That Are Won With Prayer And Worn With Thanks – Prayer Quotes

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Those Blessings Are Sweetest That Are Won With Prayer And Worn With Thanks – Prayer Quotes.



“Is prayer your steering wheel or your spare tire?” 

Corrie Ten Boom


“I have been driven many times upon my knees by the overwhelming conviction that I had no where else to go. My own wisdom and that of all about me seemed insufficient for that day.” 

Abraham Lincoln


“Every time, before you intercede, worship God in His glory, and be quiet first. Think of what joys to hear the prayers of His people, and can perform. Think of privilege and your place and expect good things!” 

Andrew Murray



“Prayer isn’t learned in a class room, but in the closet.” 

Edward McKendree Bounds


“You need to remain in living, lasting functional, abiding union with the Lord Jesus, if you’d like that power in prayer.” 

Charles Haddon Spurgeon


“Prayer is where the action is.” 

John Wesley


“True prayer is quantified by weight, not by length. A oration of length could not have fullness of prayer in it than A groan before God.”

Charles Haddon Spurgeon


“If the only prayer you said was thank you, that would be enough.” 

Meister Eckhart


“Talking to men for God is the usual fantastic thing, but speaking to God for men is greater.”

Edward McKendree Bounds


“Hearing God will make a prayer.” 

Andrew Murray


“Prayer doesn’t fit us for the greatest work, prayer is the greater work.” 

Oswald Chambers


“Sometimes I go to God and say, “God, if Thou dost never answer another prayer while I live on this earth, I will still worship Thee as long as I live and in the ages to come for what Thou hast done already. God’s already put me so far in debt that if I were to live one million millenniums I couldn’t pay Him for what He’s done for me.” 

A.W. Tozer


“We must begin to feel that God, might bring down its power to earth, and in the mystery of prayer, he gave us with a power which could move the Heavenly Earth.” 

Andrew Murray


“Help” is a prayer that is always answered. It doesn’t matter how you pray–with your head bowed in silence, or crying out in grief, or dancing. Churches are good for prayer, but so are garages and cars and mountains and showers and dance floors. Years ago I wrote an essay that began, “Some people think that God is in the details, but I have come to believe that God is in the bathroom.” 

Anne Lamott


“Prayer is not asking. Prayer is putting oneself in the hands of God, at His disposition, and listening to His voice in the depth of our hearts.” 

Mother Teresa


“We have to pray with our eyes on God, not on the difficulties.” 

Oswald Chambers


“As the books of Job, Jeremiah, and Habakkuk clearly show, God has a high threshold of tolerance for what appropriate to say in a prayer. God can “handle” my unsuppressed rage. I may well find that my vindictive feelings need God’s correction – but only by taking those feelings to God will I have the opportunity for correction and healing.” 

Philip Yancey


“Prayer can never be in surplus.”

Charles Haddon Spurgeon


“I have so much to do that I shall spend the first three hours in prayer.” 

Martin Luther


“The man who mobilizes the church will create the best contribution.” 

Andrew Murray


“A Christian fellowship lives and exists by the intercession of its members for one another, or it collapses. I can no longer condemn or hate a brother for whom I pray, no matter how much trouble he causes me. His face, that hitherto may have been strange and intolerable to me, is transformed in intercession into the countenance of a brother for whom Christ died, the face of a forgiven sinner.” 

Dietrich Bonhoeffer


“Any concern too small to be turned into a prayer is too small to be made into a burden.” 

Corrie Ten Boom


“I’ve seen many men work without praying, though I’ve never seen any good come out about it, but I’ve never seen a guy pray without working.” 

James Hudson Taylor


“Has someone or something pushed your anxiety button? Answer it with prayer!” 

Evinda Lepins


“Our prayers should be for blessings in general, for God knows best what is good for us.'” Moira smiled as she quoted the ancient sage, then shrugged. “It made sense to me. After that, I started laying my problems and needs before God and asking for grace and guidance and whatever other virtues he thought I needed.” 

Irene Hannon


“Those blessings are sweetest that are won with prayer and worn with thanks.” 

Thomas Goodwin


“Let us never forget to pray. God lives. He is near. He is real. He is not only aware of us but cares for us. He is our Father. He is accessible to all who will seek Him.” 

Gordon B. Hinckley


“He who kneels the most, stands the best.” 

D.L. Moody


“In prayer it is better to have a heart without words than words without a heart.”

 John Bunyan


“That is to say, I pray for you. And there’s an intimacy in it. That’s the truth.” 

Marilynne Robinson


“We tend to use prayer as a last resort, but God wants it to be our first line of defense. We pray when there’s nothing else we can do, but God wants us to pray before we do anything at all.

Most of us would prefer, however, to spend our time doing something that will get immediate results. We don’t want to wait for God to resolve matters in His good time because His idea of ‘good time’ is seldom in sync with ours.” 

Oswald Chambers


“In the silence of the heart God speaks. If you face God in prayer and silence, God will speak to you. Then you will know that you are nothing. It is only when you realize your nothingness, your emptiness, that God can fill you with Himself. Souls of prayer are souls of great silence.” 

Mother Teresa


“Go where your best prayers take you.” 

Frederick Buechner


“Prayer may just be the most powerful tool mankind has.”

Ted Dekker


“When you have reached your own room, be kind to those who have chosen different doors and to those who are still in the hall. If they are wrong they need your prayers all the more; and if they are your enemies, then you are under orders to pray for them. That is one of the rules common to the whole house.” 

C.S. Lewis


“… Goals not bathed in prayer or brought in humility before the Lord turn out to be downright useless. They don’t go anywhere. They don’t accomplish anything.” 

Charles R. Swindoll


“In the end, the number of prayers we say may contribute to our happiness, but the number of prayers we answer may be of even greater importance.” 

Dieter F. Uchtdorf


“Be not forgetful of prayer. Every time you pray, if your prayer is sincere, there will be new feeling and new meaning in it, which will give you fresh courage, and you will understand that prayer is an education.” 

Fyodor Dostoevsky


“And we pray, and we pray and we pray and we pray.

Everyday, everyday, everyday, everyday…” 

Bone Thugs and Harmony


“I have now concentrated all my prayers into one, and that one prayer is this, that I may die to self, and live wholly to Him.” 

Charles H. Spurgeon



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What Is Sanctification And Being Set Apart – Spiritual Reading

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What Is Sanctification And Being Set Apart – Spiritual Reading.



In the first place let me make it clear that, Sanctification is not the “Baptism with the Holy Spirit.” The two are constantly confused. There is an intimate relation between the two, but they are not at all one and the same thing; and only confusion and misconception can arise from confounding two experiences which God keeps separate. That Sanctification is not the baptism with the Holy Spirit and that the baptism with the Holy Spirit is not Sanctification, will become clear as we proceed and find out from a study of the Bible just what Sanctification is.


In the second place, let me say that Sanctification is not the eradication of the carnal nature. We will see this when we come to examine God’s definition of Sanctification; for God has very clearly defined what Sanctification is and when it takes place. Those who teach “the eradication of the carnal nature” are grasping after a great and precious truth, but they have expressed that truth in a very inaccurate, unfortunate, and unscriptural way, and this way of stating it leads to grave misapprehensions and errors and abuses.


The whole controversy about “the eradication of the carnal nature” arises from a misapprehension and from using terms for which there is no warrant in the Bible. The Bible nowhere speaks about “the carnal nature,” and so certainly not about “the eradication of the carnal nature.” There is such a thing as a carnal nature, but it is not a material thing, not a substance, not a something that can be eradicated as you pull a tooth or remove the vermiform appendix. “A carnal nature” is a nature controlled by the flesh. Certainly it is a believer’s privilege not to have his nature governed by the flesh.


Our nature should be and may be under the control of the Holy Spirit, and then it is not a carnal nature; but one nature has not been eradicated and another nature put in its place, but our nature is taken out from under the control of the flesh and put under the control of the Holy Spirit. Furthermore, while it is our privilege to have our nature under the control of the Holy Spirit and delivered from the control of the flesh, we still have “the flesh,” and shall have the flesh as long as we are in this body.


But if we “walk by the Spirit” we do not “fulfil the lusts of the flesh” (Gal. 5:16). The 8th chapter of Romans describes the life of victory, just as the 7thchapter, 9-24 verse describes the life of defeat, when men are “carnal, sold under sin,” but it is in the 8th chapter where life “in the Spirit” is described (Rom. 8:9) that we are told that we still have the flesh, but that it is our privilege not to “live after the flesh,” but “by the Spirit,” to “put to death the deeds of the body.” So we see that the body is there, but in the power of the Spirit we do, day by day and (if we live up to our privilege) every day and every hour and every minute, continuously “put to death the deeds of the body.”


So much as to what Sanctification is not. We will see exactly what it is if we look at God’s definition of Sanctification. We shall find that the word Sanctification is used in the Bible in a two-fold sense.


The first meaning of Sanctification we will find in Lev. 8:10-12, “And Moses took the anointing oil, and anointed the tabernacle and all that was therein, and sanctified them. And he sprinkled thereof upon the altar seven times, and anointed the altar and all its vessels, and the laver and its base, to sanctify them. And he poured of the anointing oil upon Aaron’s head and anointed him to sanctify him.” 


Now it is perfectly clear in this passage that to sanctify means to separate or set [apart for God, and that Sanctification is the process of setting apart or state of being set apart for God. The word Sanctify is used in this sense over and over again.


Another illustration is Lev. 27:14, 17. “And when a man shall sanctify his house to be holy unto God, then the priest shall estimate it, whether it be good or bad: as the priest shall estimate it, so shall it stand . . . and if a man shall sanctify unto Jehovah part of a field of his possession, then the estimation shall be according to the sowing thereof.” 


Here again it is plain that to sanctify means to separate or set apart for God, and that Sanctification is the process of setting apart or state of being set apart for God. Still another illustration of this same use of the word sanctify is found in Num.8:17, “For all the firstborn among the children of Israel are mine, both man and beast: on the day that I smote all the firstborn in the land of Egypt I sanctified them for myself.” 


This, of course, does not mean that God, at the time that He smote the firstborn in Egypt, eradicated the carnal nature from the first-born of Israel. It does mean that He set apart all the first-born to be peculiarly His own. Another very suggestive illustration of the same usage of the word is found in the case of Jeremiah as stated by himself in Jer. 1:4, 5, “Now the word of Jehovah came unto me saying, before I formed thee in the belly I knew thee; and before thou camest forth out of the womb I sanctified thee: I have appointed thee a prophet unto the nations.” 


This plainly means that before his birth God set Jeremiah apart for Himself. There would still be much imperfection and infirmity in him, but he was set apart for God. Another suggestive illustration of the same use of the word Sanctify is found in Matt. 23:27, in the words of our Lord Jesus Himself: “Ye fools and blind; for which is greater, the gold, or the temple that hath sanctified the gold?” 


But perhaps the most striking illustration of all is in what our Lord says about His own sanctification in John 17:19, “And for their sakes I sanctify myself, that they themselves also may be sanctified in truth.” Here the plain meaning is that our Lord Jesus set Himself apart for this work for God and He did it in order that believers might be set apart for God “in truth,” or “in the truth.”


This is the most frequent use of the word sanctify. There are numerous illustrations of it in the Bible. So to sanctify means to separate or set apart for God; and Sanctification is the process of setting apart or the state of being set apart for God. This is the primary meaning of the words.


But the word as used in the Bible has also a secondary signification closely related to this primary meaning. An illustration of this secondary meaning will be found in II Chron. 29:5, “Hear me, ye Levites; now sanctify yourselves, and sanctify the house of Jehovah, the God of your fathers, and carry forth the filthiness out of the holy place.” 


Bearing in mind the “parallelism” [which is the chief characteristic of Hebrew poetry, it is plain that to sanctify here is synonymous with the “Carry forth the filthiness out of the holy places” found in the last part of the verse. So to sanctify here means to separate from ceremonial or moral defilement, to cleanse; and Sanctification is the process of separating, or state of being separated from ceremonial or moral defilement.


The same use of the word is found in Lev. 11:44, “For I am Jehovah thy God: sanctify yourselves therefore, and be ye holy; for I am holy: neither shall ye defile yourselves with any manner of creeping thing that moveth upon the earth.” Here again it is clear that “sanctify yourselves” is synonymous with “be ye holy” and is contrasted with “defile yourselves” and means to separate from ceremonial or moral defilement, to cleanse; and Sanctification is the process of separating or state of being separated from ceremonial or moral defilement.


The same meaning of sanctification is found in the New Testament in I Thess. 5:23, “And the God of Peace, Himself sanctify you wholly and may your Spirit and soul and body be preserved entire, without blame at the coming of our Lord Jesus Christ.” Here we see the close relation between entire sanctification and preserving wholly, without blame, and to sanctify here clearly means to separate from moral defilement, and sanctification here again is the process of separating or state of being separated from moral defilement.


The same thing is evident [from the 4th chapter of this same epistle in the 7th verse (I Thess. 4:7), “For God called us not for uncleanness, but in sanctification.” Our “Sanctification” is here set in direct contrast with “uncleanness,” and hence it is evident that sanctification here means the state of being separated from all moral defilement. The same thing is evident from the 3rd verse of this same chapter, “For this is the will of God, even your sanctification, that ye abstain from fornication.” 


Here again it is evident that Sanctification means separation from impurity or moral defilement. The two meanings, then, of Sanctification are: the process of separating or setting apart, or state of being separated or set apart, for God; and the process of separating or state of being separated from ceremonial or moral defilement. These two meanings of the word are closely allied—one cannot be truly separated to God without being separated from sin.


Excerpt From – The Fundamental Doctrines Of The Christian Faith By Reuben Archer Torrey.



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How Can You Be Sanctified And Set Apart – Spiritual Reading

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How Can You Be Sanctified And Set Apart – Spiritual Reading.



1. The first part of the answer is found in our text of this chapter: 


I Thess. 5:23, “And the God of Peace himself sanctify you wholly and may your Spirit and soul and body be preserved entire, without blame at the coming of our Lord Jesus Christ.” It appears from this verse that God sanctifies men, and Sanctification is God’s work. Both the separation of men from sin and their separation unto God, is God’s work. As it was God who in the old dispensation set apart the first-born of Israel unto Himself, so it is God who in the new dispensation sets apart the believer unto Himself and separates him from sin. Sanctification is primarily not our work but God’s.


2. The second part of the answer is found in: 


Eph. 5:25, 26, “Husbands love your wives, even as Christ also loved the church, and gave himself up for it; that he might sanctify it, having cleansed it by the washing of water by the word.” Here we are taught that Christ sanctifies the church and that Sanctification is Christ’s work. The question, of course, arises, in what sense does Christ sanctify the church. The answer is found in Heb. 10:10, “By which will we have been sanctified through the offering of the body of Jesus Christ once for all.” 


Here it appears that Jesus Christ sanctifies the church by giving Himself up a sacrifice for it. By thus giving Himself up for it as a sacrifice Christ sets the Church apart for God. Just as the blood of the Passover Lamb in the 11th and 12th chapters of Exodus set a difference between Israel and the Egyptians, so our Lord Jesus by the offering of His own body has forever put a difference between the believer in Himself and the world, and has forever set every believer apart for God. The Cross of Christ stands between the [believer and the world. The shed blood of Christ separates the believer from the world, purchases him to God and thus makes him to belong to God.


3. The third part of the answer to the question, how men are sanctified, is found in:


 2 Thess. 2:13 and in other passages, “But we are bound to give thanks always to God for you, brethren beloved of the Lord, for that God chose you from the beginning unto salvation through sanctification of the Spirit and belief of the truth.” It appears from this passage, as from other passages in the Bible, that it is the Holy Spirit who sanctifies the believer, and that Sanctification is the Holy Spirit’s work.


Here the question arises, In what sense does the Holy Spirit sanctify the believer? In this sense, just as in the Old Testament type, tabernacle, altar and priest were set apart for God by the anointing oil (Lev. 8:10-12), so in the New Testament anti-type, the believer, who is both tabernacle and priest, is set apart for God by the anointing of the Holy Spirit. Further than that, it is the Holy Spirit’s work in the heart that overcomes the flesh and its defilements, and thus separates the believer from sin and clothes him with divine graces of character, and makes him fit to be God’s own.


As Paul puts it in Gal.5:22, 23, “But the fruit of the Spirit is love, joy, peace, longsuffering, kindness, goodness, faith, meekness, self-control.” In opposition to this work of the Holy Spirit, we read in the immediately preceding verses what “the works of the flesh” are, an awful [catalogue of vileness and sin, and we are told in the 16thverse, “Walk in the Spirit and ye shall not fulfil the lust of the flesh.”


4. The fourth part of the answer to the question how we are sanctified is found in:


 Heb. 13:12, “Wherefore, Jesus also, that he might sanctify the people through his own blood suffered without the gate.” It is plain from this passage that believers are sanctified through the blood of Jesus Christ. Here the question arises, In what sense does the blood of Jesus sanctify? The answer is plain: The blood of Jesus Christ cleanses us from all the guilt of sin, and thus separates us from the mass of men under the curse of the broken law, and sets us apart for God (cf. 1 John 1:7, 9). In the Old Testament dispensation the blood of the sacrifice cleansed the Israelites from the guilt of ceremonial offenses and set them apart for God; in the New Testament anti-type the blood of Christ cleanseth the believer from the guilt of moral offenses and sets him apart for God.


5. The fifth part of the answer to the question, how men are sanctified, is found in:


John 17:17, “Sanctify them in the truth: thy word is truth.” Here our Lord Jesus in His prayer indicates that we are sanctified in the truth, and that the truth is the Word of God. In what sense does the Word of God sanctify? This question is plainly answered in different parts of the Word of God, where we are taught that the Word of God cleanses from the presence of sin, and thus [separates us from it and sets us apart to God. (Ps. 119:9, 11; John 15:3.) As we bring our lives into daily contact with the Word, the sins and imperfections of our lives and hearts are disclosed and put away, and thus we are more and more separated from sin unto God. (cf. John 13:10.)


6. The sixth part of the answer to the question, how men are sanctified, is found in:


 1 Cor. 1:30, “But of Him are ye in Christ Jesus, who was made unto us wisdom from God, and righteousness, and sanctification, and redemption.” In this passage we are taught that Jesus Christ was made unto us from God sanctification. Just what does that mean? Simply this: that separation from sin and separation to God are provided for us in Christ Jesus and by the appropriation of Jesus Christ we obtain this sanctification thus provided.


The more completely we appropriate Christ the more completely are we sanctified. But perfect sanctification is provided for us in Him, just as perfect wisdom is provided in Him (Col. 2:3). We appropriate either wisdom or sanctification or anything else that is provided for us in Christ in ever-increasing measure. Through the indwelling Christ presented to us by the Spirit in the Word, we are made Christlike and bear fruit.


7. The seventh part of the answer to the question of how men are sanctified is found in:


 Heb. 12:14, “Follow after peace with all men, and the sanctification without which no man shall see the Lord.” Here we are taught that we have our [own part in sanctification, and that if we are to be sanctified in the fullest sense, sanctification is something that we must pursue, or seek earnestly, if we are to obtain it. While sanctification is God’s work, we have our part in it, viz., to make it the object of our earnest desire and eager pursuit.


8. The eighth part of the answer to the question of how we are sanctified is found in:


 Rom. 6:19, 22, “As ye presented your members as servants to uncleanness and to iniquity unto iniquity, even so present your members as servants to righteousness unto sanctification. . . . But now being made free from sin, and become servants to God, ye have your fruit unto sanctification.” The meaning of these words is plain, and the teaching important and practical. We are here taught that we attain unto sanctification through presenting our members as servants (bondservants, or slaves) to righteousness and becoming ourselves bondservants unto God.


In other words, if we wish to attain unto sanctification we should present our whole body and every member of it to God, to be His servants, belonging wholly unto Him, and we should present ourselves to God as His servants, to be His absolute property. This is the practical method of attaining unto sanctification, a method that is open to each one of us here to-day, no matter how weak we are in ourselves.


9. The ninth and final part of the answer to the question of how we are sanctified, is found in: 


Acts 26:18, “To open their eyes, that they may turn from darkness to light and from the power of Satan unto God, that they may receive remission of sins and an inheritance among them that are sanctified by faith in Me.” Here we are told that we are sanctified by faith in Christ. Sanctification, just as justification, regeneration, and adoption, is conditioned upon faith. Faith is the hand that appropriates to ourselves the blessing of sanctification that God has provided for us through His Son Jesus Christ by His death on the cross, and through the power of the Holy Spirit working in us. And we claim sanctification by simple faith in Him who shed His blood and by surrendering ourselves to the control of the Holy Spirit, Whom Jesus Christ gives.


Excerpt From – The Fundamental Doctrines Of The Christian Faith By Reuben Archer Torrey.



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How To Be Victorious And Triumph Over The Devil – Spiritual Reading

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How To Be Victorious And Triumph Over The Devil – Spiritual Reading.



Now just for a few moments let me show you from the Word of God, how, in practical every day life, to get the victory over the Devil. There are four things to be borne in mind.


1. Read first:


James 4:7, “Be subject therefore unto God: but resist the devil, and he will flee from you.” This teaches us that, we are first of all to surrender to God and then to resist the Devil and that, if we do resist him, for all his cunning and power, he will flee from us. Although the Devil is strong, it is ours in God’s strength to withstand him and overcome him.


2. Now turn to: 


I John 2:14: “I have written unto you, fathers, because ye know him which is from the beginning. I have written unto you young men, because ye are strong, and the word of God abideth in you, and ye have overcome the evil one.” This passage teaches us that, it is when we feed upon the Word of God and store the Word of God in our hearts, thus having it abiding in us, that we shall be able to overcome the Devil. If we neglect the study of the Bible for a single day, we leave an open door for the Devil to enter. I have been a Christian for forty-three years, but I would not dare to neglect the study of God’s word for one single day. Why not? Because there is a devil; and, if I neglect the study of the Word of God for a single day, I leave a window open for him to enter and leave myself too weak to cope with him and conquer him. But if we will feed upon the Word of God daily, and trust in God, we can resist the devil at every point. Though the Devil is cunning and strong, God is stronger, and God imparts His strength to us through His written word.


3. Turn now to: 


Eph. 6:11: “Put on the whole armour of God, that ye may be able to stand against the wiles of the devil.” Here we are taught that, in order“to stand against the wiles of the Devil” we must “Put on the whole armour of God.” What that armour is, is found in the verses that immediately follow. This armour, this whole armour, this “panoply of God,” is at our disposal. The fact that there is a Devil, that he is a being of such majesty, dignity, cunning, and power, that he is so incessantly plotting our ruin and to undermine our faith, is no reason for fear or discouragement. By taking “the shield of faith” we shall be “able to quench all the fiery darts of the evil one,” by taking “the helmet of salvation,” and the “sword of the Spirit which is the Word of God,” and by “praying always with all prayer and supplication in the Spirit,” it is our privilege to have victory over the Devil every day of our lives, every hour of the day, and every minute of the hour.


4. The final step in the way to get victory over Satan is found in”


 Eph. 6:10: “Finally, be strong in the Lord, and in the strength of his might.” The way to get victory over Satan is to give up all confidence in our own strength and believe in the almighty strength of Jesus Christ and claim that strength for ourselves. It is in the strength of Jesus Christ’s might that we shall get the victory over “the evil one.” In the strength of His might, as we have already said, it is our privilege to have victory over the Devil every day of our lives, every hour of the day and every minute in the hour. Hallelujah!


Excerpt From – The Fundamental Doctrines Of The Christian Faith By Reuben Archer Torrey.



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